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Mary Stanley

Known as “Fish Mary,” Mary Fernandes Santos Stanley (1894-1977) was the New Bedford waterfront’s only woman lumper in the 1950s and 1960s.
Photograph Of Alberta Simmons Brownell -- The Of Face Of A Woman With Short Dark Hair Wearing A Light Top With A Slightly V-shaped Neckline.

Alberta Simmons Brownell

Alberta Simmons Brownell (1882-1918) used book knowledge and personal experience to write articles on the social problems of the day.
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Cordelia Vien

At the peak of her career as a local businesswoman, Cordelia Dragon Vien (1853 -1928) owned property valued at $250,000, equivalent to nearly $6.5 million today, in New Bedford’s North End.
Photograph Of Suzanne Marjorie Stockard Underwood - A Young Woman With Short Black Hair, Wearing Dark Clothing And Folding Her Arms

Suzanne Marjorie Stockard Underwood

Pioneering modernist architect Suzanne Marjorie Stockard Underwood (1917-2001) was one of the first women to graduate from the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University.
Ada Nina Woolley Sullivan

Ada Woolley Sullivan

A resourceful real estate investor and astute textile mill treasurer, Ada Woolley Sullivan (1888-1968) became New Bedford’s first woman textile mill treasurer and took full charge of the Sullivan Silk Mills in 1934.
Photo Of Harriet Didriksen

Harriet Didriksen

Considered the matriarch of New Bedford’s working waterfront, Harriet Didriksen (1943-2019) advocated for fishermen, their families and the fishing industry.
Noelie Houle

Noelie Houle

Dartmouth residents learned kindness from Noelie Lemire Houle (1899-1993), the “Goat Lady of Dartmouth.” Noelie raised as many as 90 goats so that others could experience the benefits of goat’s milk. At first, neighbors complained about her farm, where goats roamed freely. Eventually, the community moved from intolerance to acceptance to celebration.
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